Review of Career Intelligence: The 12 Rules for Work and Life Success

Though it was published in 1997, many of the ideas Barbara Moses mentions in her book are still relevant, in 2015, 18 years after. The book makes a good attempt at understanding how people’s expectations differ based on the period when they enter the workforce. Particularly interesting is the difference in needs for job security, linear career progression and approach towards self-promotion.
She speaks of the shift towards project-based work, nomadic lifestyles and ‘the end of job descriptions’. Towards the second half of the book, Barbara gives some recommendations, mostly on dealing with this prevailing ambiguity. At a personal level, it has reinforced the idea that in order to survive in this age of change, it is best to think of oneself as an evolving business than as a finished product.
On a side-note, as a student of diversity, it was refreshing to learn about the ideals of androgyny where management learns to express both competitiveness and empathy, and how over the years management culture has taken a definite turn towards the masculine, with increasing use of war-like metaphors: “there will be blood on the floor”; “body-counts”; “I was ambushed” and so on.

Front Cover

Review of Career Intelligence: The 12 Rules for Work and Life Success

Exchange Experience at Kellogg: Student Clubs

Kellogg MBA Students

The winning team of the Holi Food fight organized by IBC and Kellogg Cares The winning team of the Holi Food fight organized by IBC and Kellogg Cares

Integrating exchange students into a b-school’s culture and student life is tough given the intensive nature of the MBA. Getting exchangers involved is even tougher in programs with bigger class sizes as there are fewer common classes with other students. However, as I sit down to reflect to write this blog on my experience at Kellogg, I realize that I have become completely immersed in the culture of the school. And Kellogg student clubs and events have played a major role in helping me achieve this level of immersion.

On an exchange, one is away from one’s normal circle of friends and family. This compounds the cultural shock of landing in a new country with different customs and culture. So getting the right friends quickly is important to deal with such situations. I was lucky enough…

View original post 267 more words

Exchange Experience at Kellogg: Student Clubs

Interview: Essec Leadership and Diversity chair

The ESSEC Leadership and Diversity Chair is a specialized set of courses and seminars that helps management students reflect on who they are as individuals and connects them to industry experts from L’Oreal, Deloitte, Air France and other companies.

Interview: Essec Leadership and Diversity chair

Organizational engineering

As a biotechnologist one works on the optimization of enzyme production from bacteria. Optimization is a process where certain genes are altered or the environmental conditions are altered so that the organism produces more of the desired enzyme. To optimize output, pesticides and fertilizers are used on plants and artificial hormones are used on animals. Scientists study, monitor and optimize microbes, plants and animals.
Who monitors, controls and optimizes people? What organizations are we creating and worshipping these days? Should we create ‘efficient’ organizations full of people who like being injected with stimulants like coffee? Or would we rather have organic healthier people working over the long term? For optimizing output, should we interfere and decide the work schedules? Should we decide what people wear, how the office should look and how people communicate? Or should we just provide enough resources for people to self-organize and self-optimize? How does it work in your country, university, company, club, organization?

After a few weeks of posting this article, I found an interesting link on how your lifestyle has been designed – http://www.raptitude.com/2010/07/your-lifestyle-has-already-been-designed/

Also, here’s a more recent talk by Martin Reeves, a BCG Strategist, on building long-lasting organizations by mastering the art of ‘biological thinking’.
https://embed-ssl.ted.com/talks/martin_reeves_how_to_build_a_business_that_lasts_100_years.html

Organizational engineering